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Typically, certain leagues present a very significant players rotation between national and foreign clubs. This situation tends to occur mainly in leagues considered less competitive and known as markets in which clubs aim to develop young talents and sell them to teams with more financial power.
In this sense, Football Industry compared clubs’ lineups on the last matchday of 2012/2013 with the ones presented on matchday 1 of 2013/2014. We analyzed the following competitions: Bundesliga (Germany), Liga BBVA (Spain), Ligue 1 (France), Eredivisie (Netherlands), Barclays Premier League (England) and Liga ZON Sagres (Portugal).
GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE
In general terms, Spanish and Portuguese leagues present the highest average number of changes in the starting 11, mainly with players who were not part of the squads in 2012/2013.
Barclays Premier League and Bundesliga, considered, at this time, the most competitive leagues, show the lowest average number of lineup changes, equally distributed between players who were part of the squads in 2012/2013 and were signed for 2013/2014.
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IMPACT OF A NEW COACH
When analyzing the impact of the arrival of a new coach at the start of 2013/2014, we can observe that, on average, only in the Netherlands and Portugal this situation led to a higher number of changes in the starting 11.
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This research was discussed on the TV show “Maisfutebol“, of TVI24, on the 23rd of August.
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NOTES: 1.Only were considered clubs that remained in the analyzed leagues between 2012/13 and 2013/14; 2.Signings include loan returns; 3.Sascha Lewandowski left the technical team of Bayer Leverkusen, however, Sami Hyypia remained; 4.The matches of Eredivisie’s play-off were included in the analysis; 5.Italian Serie A was not included because only began on the 25th of August.
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Season tickets are an important part of what is considered the core business of football clubs: matchday revenues. Although this flow has been losing weight compared to commercial revenues and television rights (in 2011/2012 only represented between 14% and 28% of Deloitte Football Money League’s clubs figures), especially in the case of most renowned clubs, the amounts received for season tickets are very important in an early stage of the season (in most cases are paid in cash) and provide a minimum guarantee of attendance throughout the year.
Thus, Football Industry gathered the minimum prices of season tickets for 2013/2014 of the clubs competing in the following leagues: Liga ZON Sagres (Portugal), Bundesliga (Germany), Serie A (Italy), Barclays Premier League (England) and Liga BBVA (Spain).
Portuguese top division clubs charge a minimum average price of 81 Euros for their season seats, a substantially lower amount compared to the ones charged in the other countries included in this analysis. While the Italian and Spanish clubs present minimum average prices and average occupation rates relatively similar (see table below), the English and German ones, despite having high and similar average occupation rates, practice different prices (see table below). This situation has to do with a different strategy and mindset as the clubs from Bundesliga seek to be fully oriented to their fans and, thus, do not follow policies of price increases. This mindset allows, for example, a club like Bayern Munchen to offer a season seat for only 120 Euros.
Regarding the financial impact of buying a season ticket based on the monthly GDP per capita (purchasing power parity), we can conclude that in the Portuguese case, the average minimum price represents 5% of this indicator while in England a fan would have to make an investment equivalent to 25% of the country’s monthly GDP per capita.
Simultaneously, the lower occupation rate presented by Portuguese clubs requires them to perform adjustments on prices. For example, Portugal has 62% of Germany’s GDP per capita while its season tickets minimum average price only corresponds to 37% of the average Bundesliga’s amount (average occupation rate: 40% vs. 92%).
The substantially higher prices charged in England, Italy, Spain and Germany are also related to the fact that the clubs from these countries tend to include other matches besides the national league in their season tickets offer (e.g. national cup matches).
Minimum Average Prices and their Financial Impact
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LIST OF CLUBS’ MINIMUM SEASON TICKETS PRICES
 
Notes: (1) Exchange Rates as at August 06, 2013: 1 USD = 0,751496 EUR; 1 GBP = 1,15813 EUR; (2) Were only considered minimum adult standard prices (without any discounts); (3) No prices were considered for season seats renewal.

 
Last July, UEFA revealed the prizes awarded to clubs that competed in the 2012/2013 editions of the UEFA Champions League (CL) and UEFA Europa League (EL).
In this context, we present an overview of the performance of the clubs that took part in these competitions between 2009/2010 and 2012/2013 (period after the process of UEFA Cup‘s rebranding).
The prizes awarded by UEFA to clubs that reach the group stage of the competition are based on the following points (2012/2013 amounts):
1.Participation bonus: the same for all clubs (8.6 million Euros in CL 12/13 and 1.3 million Euros in EL 12/13);
2.Performance bonus in the Group Stage: 1 million Euros per win and 500,000 for each draw in CL 12/13 and 200,000 per win and 100,000 for each tie in EL 12/13;
3.Market Pool: amount of the TV rights distributed according to the value of the television market of the club’s country of origin;
4.Place achieved in the Group Stage (only for EL): prize awarded to the 1st and 2nd placed teams of each group (400,000 Euros for the 1st placed and 200,000 Euros for the 2nd one in EL 12/13);
5.Round of 32 (only for EL): bonus for qualifying to this stage of the competition (200,000 Euros in EL 12/13);
6.Round of 16: bonus for qualifying to this stage of the competition (3.5 million Euros in CL 12/13 and 350,000 Euros in EL 12/13);
7.Quarter-finals: bonus for qualifying to this stage of the competition (3.9 million Euros in CL 12/13 and 450,000 Euros in EL 12/13);
8.Semi-finals: bonus for qualifying to this stage of the competition (4.9 million Euros in CL 12/13 and 1 million Euros in EL 12/13);
9.Runners-up: 6.5 million Euros in CL 12/13 and 2.5 million Euros in EL 12/13;
10.Winner: 10.5 million Euros in CL 12/13 and 5 million in EL 12/13;
11.We must also consider the Market Pool distributed to the teams that participated in EL by having reached the 3rd place in the group stage of the CL.
Thus, between 2009/10 and 2012/13, Chelsea was the club earning the largest amount (178 million Euros). In the Top 10 we can find three clubs from England (Chelsea, Manchester United and Arsenal), three from Italy (AC Milan, Internazionale and Juventus), two from Spain (Barcelona and Real Madrid) and two from Germany (Bayern Munchen and Borussia Dortmund). Regarding the Portuguese teams, FC Porto comes in the 17th place, SL Benfica in the 18th, SC Braga in the 42nd and Sporting CP in the 77th one.
In this period, 146 clubs from 34 countries took part in these competitions. When analyzing the bonus distribution by country, it turns out that England was the country raising the highest amount (647 million Euros) being represented by 11 clubs, followed by Spain with 560 million Euros and 10 clubs. Portugal comes in the 6th place with 161 million Euros and 7 clubs.
During these 4 seasons, UEFA distributed about 3,804 million Euros to the clubs that took part in the group stages and onwards of these competitions.
 
 
TOP 50 – CLUBS THAT RECEIVED MORE REVENUES FROM UEFA (09/10 to 12/13)
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REVENUES BY COUNTRY – All the participating teams between 09/10 and 12/13 (146 Clubs)
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Salários anual médio por jogador (mais alto vs mais baixo) 11-12

Bloomberg Sports published for the first time its Football Power Top 50 that ranks players from the 5 main European leagues (England, France, Germany, Italy and Spain) according to their performance in 2012/2013 in statistical terms.
According to this list, the 11 best players of each league were the following ones:
Liga BBVA (Spain)
Courtois (Atl. Madrid); Dani Alves (Barcelona), Diego Mainz (Granada), Diego Godín (Atl. Madrid) and Nacho (Betis); Xavi (Barcelona); Patrick Ebert (Valladolid), Lionel Messi (Barcelona) and Cristiano Ronaldo (Real Madrid); Falcao (Atl. Madrid) and Alvaro Negredo (Sevilla).
Serie A (Italy)
Abbiati (AC Milan); Konko (Lazio), Chiellini (Juventus), Campagnaro (Napoli) and Asamoah (Juventus); Pirlo (Juventus); Cuadrado (Fiorentina), Hamsik (Napoli) and Bonaventura (Atalanta); Cavani (Napoli) and Lamela (AS Roma).
Barclays Premier League (England)
Mignolet (Sunderland); Rafael (Manchester United), Vertonghen (Tottenham), Chico (Swansea) and Baines (Everton); Arteta (Arsenal); Walcott (Arsenal), Cazorla (Arsenal) and Bale (Tottenham); Van Persie (Manchester United) and Luis Suarez (Liverpool).
Ligue 1 (France)
Kossi Agassa (Reims); Rudy Mater (Valenciennes), Sakho (Paris Saint-Germain), Carlos Henrique (Bordeaux) and Bernard Mendy (Brest); Gonalons (Lyon); Dossevi (Valenciennes), Valbuena (Marseille) and Yohan Mollo (St. Etienne); Ibrahimovic (Paris Saint-Germain) and Aubameyang (St. Etienne).
Bundesliga (Germany)
Ron-Robert Zieler (Hannover); Lahm (Bayern Munchen), Dante (Bayern Munchen), Hummels (Borussia Dortmund) and Oliver Sorg (Friburgo); Schweinsteiger (Bayern Munchen); Thomas Müller (Bayern Munchen), Marco Reus (Borussia Dortmund) and Ribéry (Bayern Munchen); Lewandowski (Borussia Dormtund) and Stefan Kiessling (Leverkusen).

Throughout the 2012/2013 season, the clubs from the top 5 European leagues (Barclays Premier League, Serie A, Liga BBVA, Ligue 1 and Bundesliga) presented 14 different tactical formations. The highest diversity level was registered in the Italian League (11 different formations).
Currently, the most widely used option is “4-2-3-1” having been presented by more than half of the clubs, except in Italy. In the case of the Spanish League, it was adopted by 90% of the teams over the last season.
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Note: We only considered the tactical formations used by the clubs in more than 50% of their matches in the competitions mentioned above.

After the huge on-pitch success of Bayern Munchen this season, the German club took the lead of the 2013 edition of the ranking compiled by Brand Finance which includes the 50 world’s most valuable football brands.
Inversely, Manchester United went on to take the second place in the ranking being, however, beyond Real Madrid, the only team with an AAA+ rating assigned by Brand Finance.
Spanish and Italian clubs have seen their growth be affected by adverse economic conditions. On the other hand, Brazilian and Turkish clubs registered significant growth rates associated with the emerging economies of their countries and the passion of their supporters.
The average growth of the 50 brands within the ranking was 7% adding together a total value of 6,647 million Euros. Currently, the 50 clubs represented are associated with 10 different suppliers of sports equipment (the lead belongs to Adidas with 18 clubs followed by Nike with 14).
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The ranking includes clubs from ten different countries being England and Germany the two ones most represented (14 and 8 clubs respectively) aggregating more than 50% of the total value of the 50 brands.
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Note: Exchange rate May 29, 2013: 1 USD = 0,772821 EUR.

After the final of the UEFA Champions League, we present some key figures of the 2012/2013 edition regarding the games, teams and players that took part in this competition.
 
Games: 124
Teams: 32
Players: 704 (average of 22 per team)
Goals: 365 (2.9 per game)
1-15 Minute Goals: 41 (11.1%)
16-30 Minute Goals: 55 (14.9%)
31-45 Minute Goals: 61 (16.5%)
– Additional Time (1st half) Goals: 7 (1.9%)
– 46-60 Minute Goals: 59 (15.9%)
– 61-75 Minute Goals: 57 (15.4%)
– 76-90 Minute Goals: 68 (18.4%)
– Additional Time (2nd half) Goals: 22 (5.9%)
– Extra Time (1st half) Goals: 0 (0%)
– Extra Time (2nd half) Goals: 0 (0%)
– Offsides: 662 (5.3 per game)
– Fouls: 3,395 (27.4 per game)
Corner Kicks: 1,296 (10.5 per game)
– Yellow cards: 545 (4.4 per game)
– Red Cards: 20 (0.2 per game)
Top 3 Best Scorers: 1st – Cristiano Ronaldo, Real Madrid (12 Goals, Accuracy 16%, scored every 90 minutes), 2nd – Robert Lewandowski, Borussia Dortmund (10 goals; Accuracy 22%, scored every 109 minutes); 3rd – Burak Yilmaz, Galatasaray (8 goals, 24% Accuracy, scored every 96 minutes)
Top 3 Players with More Assists: 1st – Zlatan Ibrahimovic, PSG (7), 2nd – Karim Benzema, Real Madrid (5), 3rd – Mesut Ozil, Real Madrid (5)
– Top 3 Players with More Shots on Target: 1st – Cristiano Ronaldo, Real Madrid (53 shots, 4.4 per game), 2nd – Lionel Messi, Barcelona (28 shots, 2.5 per game), 3rd – Robert Lewandowski, Borussia Dortmund (26 shots, 2 per game)
Teams with More Goals per game: 1st – Chelsea, England (2.67), 2nd – Bayern Munchen, Germany (2.38), 3rd – Real Madrid, Spain (2.17)
Goals per Match Finalists: Bayern Munchen, Germany (2.38); Borussia Dortmund, Germany (1.85)
Top 3 Teams with More Shots on Target: 1st – Real Madrid, Spain (135), 2nd – Borussia Dortmund, Germany (115), 3rd – Bayern Munchen, Germany (113)
Commercial Gross Revenues (Euros): 1,340 million
Revenues Distributed to Clubs (Euros): 910 million
 
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At a time when most European leagues are about to end, we present five young players who stood out in those which are considered the five most competitive championships, namely, Barclays Premier League (England), Bundesliga (Germany), Liga BBVA (Spain), Ligue 1 (France) and Serie A (Italy).
MARIO GOTZE – Bundesliga
Mario Gotze made ​​an impressive season and has already been “rewarded” with a transfer to Bayern Munchen for about 37 million Euros. The player stands out for its passing, crossing, dribbling and vision ability. Gotze also presented an interesting goalscoring sheet being responsible for 12.5% of Borussia Dortmund‘s goals in 12/13 Bundesliga being also important on defensive moments (2.8 interceptions and tackles per game).
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ERIK LAMELA – Serie A
Although AS Roma has made ​​a modest championship, Erik Lamela has confirmed his potential. The youngster has shown a remarkable ability to dribble and shot scoring 21.7% of the goals of his team.
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SERGE AURIER – Ligue 1
The youngster from Ivory Coast, who plays for Toulouse, has proved to have great potential in tackles, interceptions and aerial duels but still needs to improve on the offensive moments.
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MATIJA NASTASIC – Barclays Premier League
The Serbian central defender who moved from Fiorentina to Manchester City has confirmed his potential and received several praises despite the less successful campaign of his team this year. Matija Nastasic has shown a great ability especially in aerial duels, although this was not confirmed offensively, good passing ability, strong in tackling and fewer fouls per game.
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KOKE – Liga BBVA
The midfielder from  Atlético Madrid‘s “cantera” has been highlighted for his ability to pass and cross (has also played as a winger) and his defensive contribution. Moreover, he has been also responsible for a significant part of his team’s passing (9% of his team’s total passes).
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Notes: (1) Were only considered players with 21 or fewer years of age playing in the German, Spanish, French, English and Italian leagues; (2) The data presented in this article refers to the competitions mentioned above; (3) Data collected on May 18, 2013.
DATA PROVIDER: WhoScored.com
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It is a thought that comes up often among those who follow football and discusses it daily: “teams, after being eliminated in the UEFA competitions, tend to show a poorer form.” Is this statement true?
In this context, Football Industry analyzed the performance of the 240 teams that participated in the last three editions of the UEFA Champions League and UEFA Europa League (2009/2010, 2010/2011 and 2011/2012) in the three games before their elimination in these competitions comparing them with the three games held after this event.
In the three seasons analyzed, the majority of the teams presented a poorer form after being eliminated in the UEFA competitions. Thus, in 2009/2010, 43% of the teams had worse outcomes after finishing their participation in these competitions. This value was 48% in 2010/2011 and 40% in 2011/2012.
Overall, the values ​​are the following ones:
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However, these values ​​differ depending on the league in which the team participates. Thus, we present below, the analysis of the performance of the teams after their elimination in UEFA competitions, by country:
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Regarding the leagues considered more competitive, the so-called Big 5 (Germany, Spain, France, England and Italy), we can observe that most of the teams from Germany, Spain and Italy had poorer results, while in the case of the English teams there is an equal number of clubs with a better and worse record and, in the case of the French teams, they tend to register better results after being eliminated from UEFA competitions.
Overall, in 15 of the 33 countries, clubs experienced a poorer form, in 8 cases better results, and in 2 there were no changes. In other countries there were equal percentages in two or more fields (eg. equal number of teams that have improved and worsened their form).
 
Notes: (1) UEFA competitions matches were not considered in the analysis of the performance of the teams before and after their elimination in these competitions (only were considered national competitions), (2) The analysis was performed from the group stage of the UEFA Champions League and UEFA Europa League onwards.
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